Recipes

Ice Cream, Down to a Tea

October 29, 2014

Tea Ice Cream - irenekly

 

A while back, I worked on another article for Ardent Magazine, which you can read here. Working on this article consisted of dreaming up ice cream flavors and making them happen–possibly one of my favorite things to do. I think my favorite from the bunch was the Genmaicha with Sea Salt and Honey. So. Tasty.

An excerpt on my inspiration for these ice cream flavors:

Here are three flavors that were born from past travels: the Genmaicha slowly sipped during quiet mornings in Kyoto, Rooibos Tea enjoyed while my cousin relayed stories from her trip to South Africa, and Lady Grey Tea had with some excellent scones during cream tea at Grantchester in Cambridgeshire.

The possibilities for tea + ice cream flavors are endless! What should be next? Perhaps Jasmine or English Breakfast?

How to Throw a Pickling Party

September 7, 2014

 

The lovely Sarah of Ardent Magazine reached out to me a couple months ago about writing some stories for the magazine, and I of course said an honored yes. Here’s the first one–a watercolored poster of how to throw a pickling party, inspired by my birthday pickling party not too long ago. 

How to Throw a Pickling Party - irenekly

How to Throw a Pickling Party - irenekly

Snap up the last of that glorious summer abundance and do some quick pickling! Make sure tasty beer and a most excellent playlist is involved. And friends! The most important part of any party. Read the detailed how-to here

The Gift That’s Really Giving | Roasted Strawberry Balsamic Ice Cream

June 16, 2014

An ice cream machine. So wonderful.

Some terrific friends birthday gifted me one and it’s been too much fun making ice cream at a slightly crazed rate. There are just too many recipes to try! And many eager ice cream tasters. Be warned that you may be seeing many more ice cream related blog posts in the future.

Roasted Strawberry Balsamic Ice Cream Roasted Strawberry Balsamic Ice Cream

The ice cream pictured here was actually my second baby (yeah. All of them are my babies). The first was this magnificent honey thyme blackberry goat cheese ice cream, recipe courtesy of the genius that is Reclaiming Provincial. It was so, so good and flavorful, save my rookie mistake of not straining out the blackberry seeds.

This strawberry balsamic beauty really took the prize for its texture: superbly creamy, perfect for balancing out the acidity of the strawberries and balsamic. Roasting the strawberries made these summer treasures only sweeter and richer, and I was tempted to shake in some pepper in true Italian fashion but decided against it in the end.

Roasted Strawberry and Balsamic Ice Cream 
I combined the custard base from Reclaiming Provincial with a hybrid of multiple roasted strawberry balsamic vinegar recipes from a motley of sources.  

2 cups strawberries
2 tablespoons good balsamic vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar

2 cups heavy cream
1 cup milk
1/2 cup sugar
4 egg yolks

Toss strawberries, balsamic vinegar, and sugar together in a bowl and let them happily macerate for 20 minutes. Pour onto baking sheet covered in parchment paper and roast at 425F until they start carmelizing, 10-15 minutes. Make sure to stir in between so they roast evenly. Using an immersion blender, puree strawberry balsamic mixture.

Combine milk and heavy cream in a saucepan and bring to boil. Remove from heat.

Whisk egg yolks together. Temper by whisking in the milk + cream mixture a spoonful at a time until you’ve added about a cup of the cream. Pour in egg mixture back into the pan slowly and cook over low heat, stirring constantly until the mixture coats the back of a spoon. Stir in strawberry puree and refrigerate mixture until chilled.

Then, do as your ice cream machine says and you should be good to go! To avoid that icicle-y texture unfortunately typical to homemade ice cream, I freeze my ice cream mixture once churned in the frozen thingie that the machine comes with. A faster freeze = less ice particles. Also, sealing everything air tight is very important!

 

L’espirit de la Mer and Subsequently, Some Olive Oil Cake

June 4, 2014

Crickets were making quite the ruckus on the blog frontier, but I’m back! May truly was one of those crazy months; it could very well be described as fantastically frenzied. I entered, somewhat clumsily, into my mid-early-twenties, threw a successful pickling party (more on both those things later), and traveled to NYC to visit my dearest friend Diane. It was a lot of nonstop everything, but hey, I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Kinfolk’s L’espirit de la Mer dinner in Brooklyn happened to land right in the middle of my NYC trip, and when I saw that it was to be hosted by Karen from Sunday Suppers  my decision to attend was pretty much made. I’ve been an ardent fan of her vision for inspiring community through shared food for a long time, so I thoroughly enjoyed her beautiful space, carefully thought out menu, and our short but lovely conversation together!

Kinfolk - Sunday Suppers
We had a mediterranean-inspired dinner that was a refreshingly simple tribute to the sea. The beet and herbed yogurt purée stole my heart, the striped bass was gloriously fresh, and the olive oil cakes with rose cream demanded to make a reappearance in my own kitchen.

Kinfolk - Sunday Suppers   Sunday Suppers - Kinfolk dinner

Kinfolk Dinners - Sunday Suppers

Talk about gorgeous! I loved watching the warm light slowly trickle out throughout the night as the bellies got fuller and the words more lingering.

Sunday Suppers - Kinfolk dinner
The best part of everything was sharing it with my one and only frangipane, Diane. She’s such a beaut! How I miss her so already!

So remember how the olive oil cakes were demanding? Here they are, happily gracing my marble slab. Seriously so delicious – the salty pistachios complement the sweetness of the rose and cake super well.

Olive Oil Cake with Rose Frosting and Salted Pistachios    Olive Oil Cake with Rose Frosting and Salted Pistachios

Olive Oil Cake with Rose Icing and Salted Pistachios

Karen made these with freshly whipped cream scented with rose, but I only had powdered sugar on hand and thus this icing was born. Happy serendipity, cause I like the way they look! Kinda like they’re dressed for a party. 

For the cake –

1 1/2 cups flour
1 cup sugar
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp kosher salt
2 large eggs
3/4 cup whole milk
1/2 cup mild-flavored olive oil

Preheat oven to 325F. Oil mini-bundt pan (make sure to get all the little cracks!). Whisk first 5 ingredients in large bowl and the rest in another. Gradually whisk the wet into the dry. Scoop batter until it barely comes up to the where the grooves of the bundt ends.

Bake for 15-20 minutes, until tester comes out clean. Let completely cool.

For the icing –

1 cup powdered sugar
1-2 tsbp warm water
1 tsp rose extract
crushed salted pistachios

Mix powdered sugar with water one tablespoon at a time. Add the extract at the end. Ice each cake and sprinkle with pistachios.

More, peas!

April 30, 2014

Irenekly - Peas on Toast

Peas! So delicious. My New Roots told me that peas are chock full of vitamins and minerals, which is really great because I secretly always liked them but avoided buying them cause I believed otherwise. Add that to the fact that I’m a big fan of open-face anything, and this simple dinner was born. Let’s call it… Peas on Toast with Other Good Stuff.

General how-to:

Semi-mash peas with a squeeze of lemon juice, pinch of salt, and pepper. Start soft-boiling an egg (6 minutes tops at a low boil). Take the ricotta and add good olive oil, salt, pepper, and caramelized shallots. Spread ricotta on nice toasty bread, top with some peas, prosciutto, greens, and egg.

I foresee this dish happening in many different variations for dinners to come! Let’s never stop, peas.

To a Tea

February 27, 2014

Of all the hot beverages out there, I think tea is the one I’m least fanatic about, but certainly not because it isn’t well-deserved. Tea, especially of the barley, millet, or corn husk variety, was so comfortably in the background whilst growing up in a Korean household, that I never gave it much thought. A huge pot of it was always ready for us to have either cold or hot, largely unnoticed unless it was empty.

Irenekly - tea2

I suppose that’s why I will rarely buy tea like I buy a cappuccino or a cocktail – I prefer sipping my tea in the calm of home, during breakfast, after dinner, or in the afternoon lull. I by no means meticulously brew my tea, but coming home with this lovely mélange of colors and smells from the apothecary (yes, apothecary – this one.) made me think a bit harder on the art of steeping tea.

There are grand metaphors of making tea that is related to life and living in a variety of ways, I’m sure, but one that feels particularly relevant is the beauty of letting new flavors unfurl in completely different temperatures. Meaning: seeing the beauty that comes from being thrust into new environments, and enjoying the changes. I hope to live with great intention in the midst of all this transition, and watching and waiting for my tea to properly steep is helping me slow down and make each step judiciously.

Irenekly - tea1
To not have the most remarkably ordinary blend in with mundanity, but to have eyes to see the possibility of intention in the everyday. I hope for this!

Utter sidenote: these photos were taken with my iPhone and that’s pretty crazy.

Satsuma Rosemary Salt

January 10, 2014

IMG_3913

 

Basically everything that Local Milk posts, I am drooling and having those heart eye emojis over. But as much as I would like to try out Beth’s recipes, I don’t have the luxury of time/ingredients too often…except for when I’m on holiday vacay at home where my parents gloriously stock up on a slew of food! And have a crazy overrun herb garden to boot!

The recipe on Local Milk has many more herbs in the salt, but I only used rosemary, as distinguishing weeds/herbs in the garden got a little tricky. Satsumas are also my favorite, and I can eat way too many in one sitting, so basically this salt is the best and super easy to make. Find the recipe here ! I’ve already added this salt to everything and anything (i.e. mostly just veggies and chicken), but methinks sprinkling some on top of shortbread cookies would be delicious. Happy salting!

 

Baked Eggs with Miso Crème Fraîche

December 30, 2013

Processed with VSCOcam with 4 preset

A quick post on a simple, yet shnazzy breakfast recipe. The beauty of being home for the holidays means glorious ingredients so easily at hand, like these ikura, and ample time to test out new recipes.

Baked Eggs with Miso Crème Fraîche

Oven to 350, mix in salt, pepper, ginger, and teaspoon of miso into the crème fraîche, and plop a tablespoon in the ramekin. Crack an egg on top, add another tablespoon of the crème, top with dill, and pop it into the oven for 10-15 minutes, depending on how you like your eggs. Eat gustily with some crusty bread. Happy breakfasting!

Roasted Strawberry Scones (& English Habits)

October 29, 2013

IMG_3837

Found myself subconsciously recreating an English cream tea for breakfast one morning, complete with clotted cream a friend procured for me. I miss the UK! Also, I wish I learned how to make proper tea. Anyway. Due to a surprising abundance of the sweetest smelling (and tasting) strawberries at the farmer’s market,  Sunday afternoon led to googling  “roasted strawberry scones.”  I settled on this recipe  because I strongly believe the British do scones best, especially when you want to enjoy some with a cup of Lady Grey (the enamel cup pictured here is actually from Cambridge!).

Mine turned out a little more moist than expected, maybe because I switched milk with buttermilk. I also definitely struggled with measurement conversions but hey, thanks again, Google! Either way, these are delicious and make any morning or afternoon much more enjoyable. I was almost transported to those leisurely afternoons in Grantchester, surrounded by apple trees and raucous conversation spurred on by the caffeine from tea and carbs from scones. Thanks for the recipe, The British Larder!

Bringing Kinfolk to My Table

October 16, 2013

IMG_3781

As I carried  a package containing a particular cookbook home, I was surprised  and delighted that it was so heavy. Kinfolk’s new cookbook, The Kinfolk Table, is what I expected in terms of beautiful photos, recipes, and design, but I didn’t expect its length and how much fun it would be reading the many stories of inspiring and creative individuals. Whilst I pored over the recipes, one in particular caught my eye because almost everything on the ingredients list was in my fridge at that very moment! I bookmarked it for lunch the next day and thus, the first of many dishes–the sweet potato hash from the Sussman brothers–born from this cookbook graced my table.

IMG_3784

It’s a straightforward recipe with many highly compatible ingredients like sweet potatoes, corn, heirloom tomatoes, and the always-perfect topping of an egg. I didn’t have any onions so substituted leeks, and added tons of cilantro instead of parsley. This is such a good dish for a filling, healthy lunch, but also one that I would be proud to bring to a brunch potluck. I’m itching to try the other recipes (tea poached salmon!) with friends! Thanks, Kinfolk, for this lovely book of delicious treasures.

All rights reserved © Irenekly · Theme by Blogmilk + Coded by Brandi Bernoskie